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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 280351, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/280351
Research Article

Inulae Flos and Its Compounds Inhibit TNF-α- and IFN-γ-Induced Chemokine Production in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

Basic Herbal Medicine Research Group, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 305-811, Republic of Korea

Received 20 March 2012; Accepted 27 April 2012

Academic Editor: Jae Youl Cho

Copyright © 2012 Jung-Hoon Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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