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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 412736, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/412736
Research Article

In Vitro and In Vivo Genotoxicity Assessment of Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom.

KM-Based Herbal Drug Research Group, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 305-811, Republic of Korea

Received 19 March 2012; Revised 17 May 2012; Accepted 28 May 2012

Academic Editor: Alfredo Vannacci

Copyright © 2012 Youn-Hwan Hwang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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