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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 614196, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/614196
Research Article

Effectiveness of a Tai-Chi Training and Detraining on Functional Capacity, Symptomatology and Psychological Outcomes in Women with Fibromyalgia

1Department of Physical Education and Sports, School of Sports Sciences, University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain
2Department of Physical Education, School of Education Sciences, University of Cádiz, 11519 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain
3Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
4Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, 14183 Huddinge, Sweden

Received 19 January 2012; Revised 23 February 2012; Accepted 23 February 2012

Academic Editor: Ki-Wan Oh

Copyright © 2012 Alejandro Romero-Zurita et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The purpose was to analyze the effects of Tai-Chi training in women with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods. Thirty-two women with FM (mean age, 5 1 . 4 ± 6 . 8 years) attended to Tai-Chi intervention 3 sessions weekly for 28 weeks. The outcome measures were: tenderness, body composition, functional capacity and psychological outcomes (Fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), Short Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36)). Results. Patients showed improvements on pain threshold, total number of tender points and algometer score (all 𝑃 < 0 . 0 0 1 ). The intervention was effective on 6-min walk ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 0 6 ), back scratch ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 0 2 ), handgrip strength ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 0 6 ), chair stand, chair sit & reach, 8 feet up & go and blind flamingo tests (all 𝑃 < 0 . 0 0 1 ). Tai-Chi group improved the FIQ total score ( 𝑃 < 0 . 0 0 1 ) and six subscales: stiffness ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 0 5 ), pain, fatigue, morning tiredness, anxiety, and depression (all 𝑃 < 0 . 0 0 1 ). The intervention was also effective in six SF-36 subscales: bodily pain ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 0 3 ), vitality ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 1 8 ), physical functioning, physical role, general health, and mental health (all 𝑃 < 0 . 0 0 1 ). Conclusions. A 28-week Tai-Chi intervention showed improvements on pain, functional capacity, symptomatology and psychological outcomes in female FM patients.