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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 679373, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/679373
Research Article

Intracultural Variation in the Knowledge of Medicinal Plants in an Urban-Rural Community in the Atlantic Forest from Northeastern Brazil

1Laboratory of Applied Ethnobotany, Department of Biology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Avenida Dom Manoel de Medeiros s/n, Dois Irmãos, 52171-900 Recife, PE, Brazil
2Natural Products Laboratory, Pharmacy Department, Federal University of Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE, Brazil
3Ethnozoology, Conservation and Biodiversity Research Group, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58109-753 Campina Grande, PB, Brazil

Received 23 June 2011; Revised 17 August 2011; Accepted 23 August 2011

Academic Editor: Ana H. Ladio

Copyright © 2012 Cecília de Fátima Castelo Branco Rangel de Almeida et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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