Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 680407, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/680407
Research Article

Meditation-State Functional Connectivity (msFC): Strengthening of the Dorsal Attention Network and Beyond

1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27708, USA
2Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
3College of Social Work, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2570, USA
4Trinity Institute for the Addictions, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2570, USA
5Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and VISN 6 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
6Duke Integrative Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
7Thousand Petals Yoga, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA

Received 14 December 2011; Revised 11 January 2012; Accepted 12 January 2012

Academic Editor: David Mischoulon

Copyright © 2012 Brett Froeliger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. Chiesa and A. Serretti, “Mindfulness-based stress reduction for stress management in healthy people: a review and meta-analysis,” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 593–600, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. J. M. Greeson, “Mindfulness research update 2008,” Complementary Health Practice Review, vol. 14, pp. 10–18, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  3. D. S. Ludwig and J. Kabat-Zinn, “Mindfulness in medicine,” Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 300, no. 11, pp. 1350–1352, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. D. Teasdale, R. G. Moore, H. Hayhurst, M. Pope, S. Williams, and Z. V. Segal, “Metacognitive awareness and prevention of relapse in depression: empirical evidence,” Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 70, no. 2, pp. 275–287, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. S. A. Gaylord, O. S. Palsson, E. L. Garland et al., “Mindfulness training reduces the severity of irritable bowel syndrome in women: results of a randomized controlled trial,” American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 106, no. 9, pp. 1678–1688, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. S. Rosenzweig, J. M. Greeson, D. K. Reibel, J. S. Green, S. A. Jasser, and D. Beasley, “Mindfulness-based stress reduction for chronic pain conditions: variation in treatment outcomes and role of home meditation practice,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 29–36, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. S. Bowen, N. Chawla, S. E. Collins et al., “Mindfulness-based relapse prevention for substance use disorders: a pilot efficacy trial,” Substance Abuse, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 295–305, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. S. Bowen and A. Marlatt, “Surfing the urge: brief mindfulness-based intervention for college student smokers,” Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 666–671, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. E. L. Garland, S. A. Gaylord, C. A. Boettiger, and M. O. Howard, “Mindfulness training modifies cognitive, affective, and physiological mechanisms implicated in alcohol dependence: results of a randomized controlled pilot trial,” Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 177–192, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. R. Chambers, E. Gullone, and N. B. Allen, “Mindful emotion regulation: an integrative review,” Clinical Psychology Review, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 560–572, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. E. L. Garland, B. Fredrickson, A. M. Kring, D. P. Johnson, P. S. Meyer, and D. L. Penn, “Upward spirals of positive emotions counter downward spirals of negativity: Insights from the broaden-and-build theory and affective neuroscience on the treatment of emotion dysfunctions and deficits in psychopathology,” Clinical Psychology Review, vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 849–864, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. E. L. Garland, “The meaning of mindfulness: a second-order cybernetics of stress, metacognition, and coping,” Complementary Health Practice Review, vol. 12, pp. 15–30, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  13. J. Kabat-Zinn, “An outpatient program in behavioral medicine for chronic pain patients based on the practice of mindfulness meditation: theoretical considerations and preliminary results,” General Hospital Psychiatry, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 33–47, 1982. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. A. Lutz, H. A. Slagter, J. D. Dunne, and R. J. Davidson, “Attention regulation and monitoring in meditation,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 163–169, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. R. A. Baer, G. T. Smith, J. Hopkins, J. Krietemeyer, and L. Toney, “Using self-report assessment methods to explore facets of mindfulness,” Assessment, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 27–45, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. A. Moore and P. Malinowski, “Meditation, mindfulness and cognitive flexibility,” Consciousness and Cognition, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 176–186, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. E. L. Garland, “Trait mindfulness predicts attentional and autonomic regulation of alcohol cue-reactivity,” Journal of Psychophysiology, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 180–189, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  18. H. Walach, N. Buchheld, V. Buttenmüller, N. Kleinknecht, and S. Schmidt, “Measuring mindfulness-the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI),” Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 40, no. 8, pp. 1543–1555, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. Carmody and R. A. Baer, “Relationships between mindfulness practice and levels of mindfulness, medical and psychological symptoms and well-being in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program,” Journal of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 23–33, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. J. M. Greeson, D. M. Webber, M. J. Smoski et al., “Changes in spirituality partly explain health-related quality of life outcomes after Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction,” Journal of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 508–518, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  21. J. H. Austin, Zen and the Meditative Transformations of Consciousness, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 2009.
  22. E. L. Garland and M. O. Howard, “Neuroplasticity, psychosocial genomics, and the biopsychosocial paradigm in the 21st century,” Health and Social Work, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 191–199, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J. A. Dusek, H. H. Otu, A. L. Wohlhueter et al., “Genomic counter-stress changes induced by the relaxation response,” PLoS One, vol. 3, no. 7, Article ID e2576, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. B. K. Hölzel, U. Ott, T. Gard et al., “Investigation of mindfulness meditation practitioners with voxel-based morphometry,” Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 55–61, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. S. W. Lazar, C. E. Kerr, R. H. Wasserman et al., “Meditation experience is associated with increased cortical thickness,” NeuroReport, vol. 16, no. 17, pp. 1893–1897, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. E. Luders, A. W. Toga, N. Lepore, and C. Gaser, “The underlying anatomical correlates of long-term meditation: larger hippocampal and frontal volumes of gray matter,” NeuroImage, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 672–678, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. B. K. Hölzel, J. Carmody, M. Vangel et al., “Mindfulness practice leads to increases in regional brain gray matter density,” Psychiatry Research, vol. 191, no. 1, pp. 36–43, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. E. B. Short, S. Kose, Q. Mu et al., “Regional brain activation during meditation shows time and practice effects: an exploratory FMRI study,” Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 121–127, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. B. K. Hölzel, U. Ott, H. Hempel et al., “Differential engagement of anterior cingulate and adjacent medial frontal cortex in adept meditators and non-meditators,” Neuroscience Letters, vol. 421, no. 1, pp. 16–21, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. C. F. Beckmann, M. DeLuca, J. T. Devlin, and S. M. Smith, “Investigations into resting-state connectivity using independent component analysis,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, vol. 360, no. 1457, pp. 1001–1013, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. B. B. Biswal, J. Van Kylen, and J. S. Hyde, “Simultaneous assessment of flow and BOLD signals in resting-state functional connectivity maps,” NMR in Biomedicine, vol. 10, no. 4-5, pp. 165–170, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. W. W. Seeley, V. Menon, A. F. Schatzberg et al., “Dissociable intrinsic connectivity networks for salience processing and executive control,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 27, no. 9, pp. 2349–2356, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. D. Tomasi and N. D. Volkow, “Functional connectivity hubs in the human brain,” NeuroImage, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 908–917, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. M. E. Raichle, “The restless brain,” Brain Connectivity, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 3–12, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  35. M. E. Raichle, A. M. MacLeod, A. Z. Snyder, W. J. Powers, D. A. Gusnard, and G. L. Shulman, “A default mode of brain function,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 98, no. 2, pp. 676–682, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. M. E. Raichle and A. Z. Snyder, “A default mode of brain function: a brief history of an evolving idea,” NeuroImage, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 1083–1090, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. X. H. Zhao, P. J. Wang, C. B. Li et al., “Altered default mode network activity in patient with anxiety disorders: an fMRI study,” European Journal of Radiology, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 373–378, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. F. X. Castellanos, D. S. Margulies, C. Kelly et al., “Cingulate-precuneus interactions: a new locus of dysfunction in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder,” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 332–337, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. C. Sorg, V. Riedl, M. Mühlau et al., “Selective changes of resting-state networks in individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 104, no. 47, pp. 18760–18765, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. M. Liang, Y. Zhou, T. Jiang et al., “Widespread functional disconnectivity in schizophrenia with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging,” NeuroReport, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 209–213, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. Y. Liu, M. Liang, Y. Zhou et al., “Disrupted small-world networks in schizophrenia,” Brain, vol. 131, no. 4, pp. 945–961, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. I. M. Veer, C. F. Beckmann, M. van Tol et al., “Whole brain resting-state analysis reveals decreased functional connectivity in major depression,” Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, vol. 4, article 41, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  43. N. Ma, Y. Liu, N. Li et al., “Addiction related alteration in resting-state brain connectivity,” NeuroImage, vol. 49, no. 1, pp. 738–744, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. J. A. Brewer, P. D. Worhunsky, J. R. Gray, Y.-Y. Tang, J. Weber, and H. Kober, “Meditation experience is associated with differences in default mode network activity and connectivity,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 108, no. 50, pp. 20254–20259, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  45. J. H. Jang, W. H. Jung, D. H. Kang et al., “Increased default mode network connectivity associated with meditation,” Neuroscience Letters, vol. 487, no. 3, pp. 358–362, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. R. Cabeza and L. Nyberg, “Imaging cognition II: an empirical review of 275 PET and fMRI studies,” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1–47, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. T. Egner, M. Delano, and J. Hirsch, “Separate conflict-specific cognitive control mechanisms in the human brain,” NeuroImage, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 940–948, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. L. A. Kilpatrick, B. Y. Suyenobu, S. R. Smith et al., “Impact of mindfulness-based stress reduction training on intrinsic brain connectivity,” NeuroImage, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 290–298, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  49. N. K. Chen, Y. H. Chou, A. W. Song, and D. J. Madden, “Measurement of spontaneous signal fluctuations in fMRI: adult age differences in intrinsic functional connectivity,” Brain structure & function, vol. 213, no. 6, pp. 571–585, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. D. T. Stuss, “Functions of the frontal lobes: relation to executive functions,” Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 759–765, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  51. J. Medina, V. Kannan, M. A. Pawlak et al., “Neural substrates of visuospatial processing in distinct reference frames: evidence from unilateral spatial neglect,” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 21, no. 11, pp. 2073–2084, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. R. Volcic and A. M. L. Kappers, “Allocentric and egocentric reference frames in the processing of three-dimensional haptic space,” Experimental Brain Research, vol. 188, no. 2, pp. 199–213, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. B. A. Wallace and B. Hodel, Embracing Mind: The Common Group of Science & Spirituality, Shambhala, Boston, Mass, USA, 2008.