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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 857804, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/857804
Review Article

A Systematic Review of the Effect of Expectancy on Treatment Responses to Acupuncture

1Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, University of Western Sydney, NSW 2751, Australia
2School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia

Received 25 May 2011; Revised 9 August 2011; Accepted 6 September 2011

Academic Editor: David Baxter

Copyright © 2012 Ben Colagiuri and Caroline A. Smith. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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