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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 932414, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/932414
Research Article

Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

1Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of TCM, Guangzhou 510120, China
2Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Guangzhou 510006, China
3The Second Clinical Medical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510405, China

Received 4 February 2012; Accepted 27 March 2012

Academic Editor: Bing Zhu

Copyright © 2012 Jian-hua Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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