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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 959285, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/959285
Research Article

Distribution and Transmission of Medicinal Plant Knowledge in the Andean Highlands: A Case Study from Peru and Bolivia

1Centre for Development and Environment, University of Bern, Hallerstrasse 10, 3012 Berne, Switzerland
2Institute of Economic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Boulevard, Bronx, NY 10458, USA

Received 16 July 2011; Revised 7 September 2011; Accepted 7 September 2011

Academic Editor: Ulysses Paulino De Albuquerque

Copyright © 2012 Sarah-Lan Mathez-Stiefel and Ina Vandebroek. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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