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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 981523, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/981523
Research Article

Development of Specific Aspects of Spirituality during a 6-Month Intensive Yoga Practice

1Center of Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Gerhard-Kienle-Weg 4, 58313 Herdecke, Germany
2Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3Theory in Medicine, Integrative and Anthroposophic Medicine, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Gerhard-Kienle-Weg 4, 58313 Herdecke, Germany

Received 3 April 2012; Accepted 13 May 2012

Academic Editor: Andreas Michalsen

Copyright © 2012 Arndt Büssing et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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