Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 105413, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/105413
Research Article

Perspectives on Medical Services Integration among Conventional Western, Traditional Korean, and Dual-Licensed Medical Doctors in Korea

1Division of Neuropsychiatry, School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Republic of Korea
2Division of Integrative Medicine, School of Korean Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Republic of Korea
3Medical Education Unit and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan, Republic of Korea
4Family Medicine Clinic and Research Institute of Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Republic of Korea
5Division of Longevity and Biofunctional Medicine, School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Republic of Korea

Received 12 July 2013; Revised 4 October 2013; Accepted 22 October 2013

Academic Editor: Tat leang Lee

Copyright © 2013 Junghwa Lim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the perspectives on the options for the integration of western and traditional Korean medical services among three types of medical doctors with different disciplines in Korea. We surveyed and analyzed responses from 167 conventional Western medicine (WM), 135 traditional Korean medicine (KM), and 103 dual-licensed (DL) doctors who can practice both. All three kinds of doctors shared similar attitude toward license unitarization. KM doctors most strongly agreed on the need of the cooperative practice (CP) between KM and WM and on the possibility of license unitarization among three groups. DL doctors believed that CP is currently impracticable and copractice is more efficient than CP. WM doctors presented the lowest agreement on the need of CP and showed lower expectation for DL doctors as mediators between WM and KM than others. This study showed the difference of perspectives on the options for the integrative medical services among three different doctor groups in Korea. More studies are required to explore the underlying reasons for these discrepancies among WM, KM, and DL doctors.