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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 159237, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/159237
Research Article

Tongguan Capsule Protects against Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Mice

1Intensive Care Laboratory, Guangdong Province Hospital of Chinese Medicine, 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510120, China
2Animal Laboratory, Guangdong Province Hospital of Chinese Medicine, 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006, China
3Department of Oral and Maxillary Surgery, Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510140, China
4University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA

Received 15 March 2013; Revised 19 July 2013; Accepted 1 August 2013

Academic Editor: Keji Chen

Copyright © 2013 Jianyong Qi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) can induce lethal ventricular arrhythmia and myocardial infarction. One of the clinical strategies for managing patients with high risk of myocardial I/R is to prevent the occurrence of arrhythmias and limit the size of infarction following a coronary episode. Tongguan Capsule (TGC) is one of the popular herbal remedies in treating coronary artery disease in the clinics of Chinese medicine. However, the potential roles and mechanisms of TGC in reducing I/R injury are still unclear. The present study statistically assessed the effectiveness of TGC in reducing I/R injury by comparing the infarct size (IS), risk region (RR), and arrhythmia (in electrocardiogram) among four groups of surgically created mice models of myocardial I/R: SHAM, I/R, VER (I/R with verapamil 20 mg/kg pretreatment), and TGC (I/R with TGC 5 g/kg/d pretreatment). We found that IS was significantly smaller in the TGC and VER groups than I/R group, and the incidence of arrhythmias was reduced in the TGC group compared with I/R group, although there were no differences in RR among the four groups. We conclude that TGC is effective in reducing I/R injury in mice. These results provided an experimental basis for clinical application of TGC in reducing I/R injury.