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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 175135, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/175135
Review Article

Emerging Roles of Propolis: Antioxidant, Cardioprotective, and Antiangiogenic Actions

1Department of Basic and Experimental Nutrition, Institute of Nutrition, State University of Rio de Janeiro, 20559-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Department of Clinical and Toxicology Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 15 January 2013; Revised 19 March 2013; Accepted 20 March 2013

Academic Editor: Vassya Bankova

Copyright © 2013 Julio Beltrame Daleprane and Dulcinéia Saes Abdalla. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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