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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 197238, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/197238
Research Article

Acupuncture De Qi in Stable Somatosensory Stroke Patients: Relations with Effective Brain Network for Motor Recovery

1The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering, Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
2Dongzhimen Hospital of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100070, China
3Center for Integrative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, 520 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 10 April 2013; Accepted 15 May 2013

Academic Editor: Cun-Zhi Liu

Copyright © 2013 Lijun Bai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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