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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 198584, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/198584
Review Article

How Does Moxibustion Possibly Work?

1Institute of Traditional Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Section 2, Linong Street, Beitou, Taipei 112, Taiwan
2Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 115, Taiwan
3Department of Surgery, Cheng-Hsin General Hospital, Taipei 115, Taiwan

Received 16 January 2013; Accepted 4 March 2013

Academic Editor: Jaung-Geng Lin

Copyright © 2013 Jen-Hwey Chiu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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