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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 215254, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/215254
Research Article

Tai Chi for Essential Hypertension

1Department of Cardiology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beixiange 5, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China
2School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China

Received 1 March 2013; Revised 9 May 2013; Accepted 11 July 2013

Academic Editor: William W. N. Tsang

Copyright © 2013 Jie Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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