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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 217853, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/217853
Research Article

Novel Antidepressant-Like Activity of Propolis Extract Mediated by Enhanced Glucocorticoid Receptor Function in the Hippocampus

1Division of Bio-Imaging, Chuncheon Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Chuncheon 200-701, Republic of Korea
2Acupuncture & Meridian Science Research Center, College of Oriental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
3Laboratory of Neuropharmacology, Department of Nursing, Shikoku University, School of Health Sciences, Tokushima 771-1192, Japan

Received 3 January 2013; Accepted 3 June 2013

Academic Editor: Zenon Czuba

Copyright © 2013 Mi-Sook Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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