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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 238279, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/238279
Research Article

The Effects of Brazilian Green Propolis against Excessive Light-Induced Cell Damage in Retina and Fibroblast Cells

1Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Biofunctional Evaluation, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 1-25-4 Daigaku-nishi, Gifu 501-1196, Japan
2Nagaragawa Research Center, Api Co., Ltd., 692-3 Nagara, Gifu 502-0071, Japan

Received 12 August 2013; Revised 20 November 2013; Accepted 25 November 2013

Academic Editor: Seung-Heon Hong

Copyright © 2013 Hiromi Murase et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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