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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 247504, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/247504
Research Article

Pomegranate Juice Metabolites, Ellagic Acid and Urolithin A, Synergistically Inhibit Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth via Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle Control and Apoptosis

UCLA Center for Human Nutrition, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Warren Hall, 900 Veteran Avenue 1-2-213, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1742, USA

Received 21 November 2012; Accepted 19 February 2013

Academic Editor: Ari M. Mackler

Copyright © 2013 Roberto Vicinanza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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