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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 274625, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/274625
Review Article

Spiritually and Religiously Integrated Group Psychotherapy: A Systematic Literature Review

1Health, Man and Society, Institute of Public Health, SDU, Odense J. B. Winsløwsvej 9B, 5000 Odense C, Denmark
2Clinic and Policlinic for Palliative Medicine, LMU, Marchioninistraße 15, 1377 Munich, Germany
3Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS 2012-14), Stadtstraße 5, 79104, Germany

Received 10 July 2013; Accepted 20 September 2013

Academic Editor: John Swinton

Copyright © 2013 Dorte Toudal Viftrup et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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