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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 312184, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/312184
Research Article

Electroacupuncture Reduces Carrageenan- and CFA-Induced Inflammatory Pain Accompanied by Changing the Expression of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8, rather than Nav1.9, in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglia

1Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
3Division of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yunlin, Taiwan
4Acupuncture Research Center, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
5Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan
6Department of Nursing, College of Medicine & Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung, Taiwan

Received 25 December 2012; Accepted 13 February 2013

Academic Editor: Xin-Yan Gao

Copyright © 2013 Chun-Ping Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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