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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 329392, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/329392
Review Article

Factors Contributing to De Qi in Acupuncture Randomized Clinical Trials

Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, 23 Meishuguanhou Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100010, China

Received 12 April 2013; Accepted 19 May 2013

Academic Editor: Gerhard Litscher

Copyright © 2013 Yi Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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