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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 347525, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/347525
Research Article

Open Randomized Clinical Trial on JWSJZ Decoction for the Treatment of ALS Patients

1Department of Neurology, Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of TCM, 528 Zhangheng Road, Pudong New Area, Shanghai 201203, China
2Department of Rehabilitation, First Hospital of Yinchuan, 40 Liqun East Road, Xing Qing Area, Yinchuan 750001, China
3Laboratory of Neurology, Institute of Integrative Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai 200032, China
4Department of Cardiology, Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of TCM, 528 Zhangheng Road, Pudong New Area, Shanghai 201203, China

Received 27 April 2013; Revised 21 July 2013; Accepted 23 July 2013

Academic Editor: Paul Siu-Po Ip

Copyright © 2013 Weidong Pan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To investigate the efficacy and safety of the traditional Chinese medicine Jiawei Sijunzi (JWSJZ) decoction for the treatment of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods. Forty-eight patients with ALS were divided into a JWSJZ group () and a control group () using a randomized number method. Together with the basic treatment for ALS, JWSJZ decoction was added to the treatment regimen of patients in the JWSJZ group or Riluzole was administered to the control group for 6 months. Neurologists evaluated the treated and control patients using the ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS) before, 3 and 6 months after starting the additional treatments. Results. The ALSFRS scores in both groups were lower 3 and 6 months after treatment than before. There was a significant difference at 6 months after treatment between the subgroups of patients with ALS whose limbs were the initial site of attack. No serious adverse effects were observed in the JWSJZ group. Conclusion. JWSJZ decoction may be a safe treatment for ALS, and may have delayed the development of ALS, especially in the subgroup of patients in whom the limbs were attacked first when compared with Riluzole treatment.