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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 354872, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/354872
Research Article

A Valid Approach in Refractory Glossodynia: A Single-Institution 5-Year Experience Treating with Japanese Traditional Herbal (Kampo) Medicine

Japanese-Oriental (Kampo) Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-Ku, Chiba 260-8670, Japan

Received 1 April 2013; Revised 19 July 2013; Accepted 15 September 2013

Academic Editor: Takeshi Sakiyama

Copyright © 2013 Hideki Okamoto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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