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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 356737, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/356737
Research Article

Positive Effect of Propolis on Free Radicals in Burn Wounds

1Department of Community Pharmacy, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland
2Department of Biophysics, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland
3Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland
4Center of Experimental Medicine, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, 40-752 Katowice, Poland

Received 4 April 2013; Accepted 1 May 2013

Academic Editor: Ewelina Szliszka

Copyright © 2013 Pawel Olczyk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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