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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 357108, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/357108
Review Article

Yoga and Mindfulness as Therapeutic Interventions for Stroke Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review

1NMR Surgical Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Division of Burns, Massachusetts General Hospital and Shriners Burn Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
2Radiology, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA

Received 28 March 2013; Accepted 8 May 2013

Academic Editor: Marc Cohen

Copyright © 2013 Asimina Lazaridou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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