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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 413237, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/413237
Research Article

Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Supercritical-Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract from Flowers and Buds of Chrysanthemum indicum Linnén

1School of Chinese Materia Medica, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Waihuandong Road No. 232, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center, Guangzhou 510006, China
2Dongguan Mathematical Engineering Academy of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Songshan Lake High-Tech Industrial Development Zone, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808, China

Received 22 April 2013; Accepted 19 August 2013

Academic Editor: Télesphore Benoît Nguelefack

Copyright © 2013 Xiao-Li Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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