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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 423809, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/423809
Research Article

Propolis Modifies Collagen Types I and III Accumulation in the Matrix of Burnt Tissue

1Department of Community Pharmacy, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland
2Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland
3Center of Experimental Medicine, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, 40-752 Katowice, Poland
4Department of Statistics, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland

Received 3 April 2013; Accepted 29 April 2013

Academic Editor: Ewelina Szliszka

Copyright © 2013 Pawel Olczyk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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