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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 429393, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/429393
Research Article

Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF-κB

1Division of Applied Life Sciences (BK21 Plus), Graduate School, and Institute of Agriculture & Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Republic of Korea
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh
3Department of Internal Medicine and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-702, Republic of Korea
4Laboratory of Biochemistry (BK21 Plus), School of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Republic of Korea
5Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-702, Republic of Korea
6HK Biotech Co., Ltd., Jinju 660-844, Republic of Korea

Received 7 September 2013; Accepted 1 November 2013

Academic Editor: Shuang-En Chuang

Copyright © 2013 Md. Abdur Rakib et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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