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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 430851, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/430851
Research Article

An Exploratory Survey of Deqi Sensation from the Views and Experiences of Chinese Patients and Acupuncturists

1School of Acupuncture Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
2School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069, China
3The Key Unit of Evaluation of Characteristic Acupuncture Therapy, State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
4Beijing Electric Power Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100073, China
5Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Science, Beijing 100700, China

Received 12 May 2013; Accepted 22 October 2013

Academic Editor: Cun-Zhi Liu

Copyright © 2013 Hong-Wen Yuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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