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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 436913, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/436913
Review Article

Mechanisms of Electroacupuncture-Induced Analgesia on Neuropathic Pain in Animal Model

1Department of East-West Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
2Department of Physiology, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
3Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea

Received 20 February 2013; Revised 23 June 2013; Accepted 11 July 2013

Academic Editor: Lixing Lao

Copyright © 2013 Woojin Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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