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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 513149, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/513149
Research Article

A Yoga and Compassion Meditation Program Reduces Stress in Familial Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

1Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo-UNIFESP, 925, Rua Napoleão de Barros, 04024-002 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Departiment of Research, Instituto Appana Mind de Desenvolvimento Humano, 05436-020 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Instituto do Cérebro, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, 05601-901 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo-UNIFESP, 04023-062 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 13 December 2012; Accepted 29 March 2013

Academic Editor: Luciano Bernardi

Copyright © 2013 M. A. D. Danucalov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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