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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 518784, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/518784
Review Article

Acupuncture De-qi: From Characterization to Underlying Mechanism

School of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China

Received 12 April 2013; Revised 9 August 2013; Accepted 9 August 2013

Academic Editor: Lu Wang

Copyright © 2013 Shi-Peng Zhu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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