Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 538476, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/538476
Review Article

Appraisal of the Deqi Concept among Contemporary Chinese Acupuncturists

1Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, China
2European Foundation of TCM, Spain
3Acupuncture Department, Medimar International Hospital, Spain
4School of Acupuncture, Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, China
5School of Preclinical Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, China

Received 11 April 2013; Revised 4 August 2013; Accepted 19 August 2013

Academic Editor: Cun-Zhi Liu

Copyright © 2013 Sheng Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Y. B. Chen and Y. L. Deng, Contemporary Chinese Acupuncture Clinical Topic, Tianjin Science and Technology Press, Tianjin, China, 1987.
  2. X. M. Hu, The Clinical Guideline of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, People's Medical Publishing House, Beijing, China, 1991.
  3. M. L. Yang and X. S. Yang, The Collection of Zhejiang Modern Acupuncture Academic Experience, Zhejiang Science and Technology Press, Zhejiang, China, 2002.
  4. X. S. Niu, The Series of Famous Acupuncture Doctors in Beijing, China Press of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China, 2012.
  5. R. Y. Ma, The Essence of Famous Doctor of Acupuncture, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine Press, Shanghai, China, 1994.
  6. T. Huang, J. Kong, X. Huang, and Y. Xu, “Some misunderstandings of deqi phenomenon: from historic review to experimental study,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 105–109, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. S. Q. Xiao, The History of Chinese Acupuncture, Ningxia People's Medical Publishing House, Ningxia, China, 1997.
  8. D. A. Cheng, The Expanded Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion Therapy, Wuxi Acupuncture and Moxibustion Society of China, Wuxi, China, 1936.
  9. F. R. Liang, The Acupuncture, China Press of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China, 2005.
  10. Z. R. Li, The Experimental Acupuncture, China Press of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China, 2003.
  11. D. Li, The Explanation of Acupuncture and Moxibustion (Revision Eedition), Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine Publishing House, Shanghai, China, 2007.
  12. K. K. S. Hui, E. E. Nixon, M. G. Vangel et al., “Characterization of the “deqi” response in acupuncture,” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 7, p. 33, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. J. J. Mao, J. T. Farrar, K. Armstrong, A. Donahue, J. Ngo, and M. A. Bowman, “De qi: Chinese acupuncture patients' experiences and beliefs regarding acupuncture needling sensation-an exploratory survey,” Acupuncture in Medicine, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 158–165, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. X. L. Qiu, “The experience of deqi from professor M. L. Qiu,” Jiangsu Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, no. 5, pp. 20–22, 1992. View at Google Scholar
  15. J. Y. Zhang, The Experience of Golden Needle L.T.Wang, People's Medical Publishing House, Beijing, China, 2004.
  16. K. Cheng, J. S. Yang, Y. Y. Wang et al., “The opinion of deqi from professor X. N. Cheng,” China News of Traditional Chinese Medicine, no. 4, p. 1, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  17. Y. F. Ma, “Research on academician Shi Xuemin's academic though,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 421–424, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  18. Z. W. Cai and J. Zhang, “The clinical study of the special character of needle sensation,” Beijing Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, no. 1, pp. 41–43, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  19. W. Liao and S. H. Ge, “The clinical experience of jingxueshuzhen from S.H.Ge,” Journal of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibustion, vol. 25, no. 9, p. 50, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  20. J. Yue and X. X. Pan, “The experience of acupuncture and moxibustion from chief physician L.F.Wei,” Journal of Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 42–43, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  21. L. G. Liu and Q. S. Ji, “The exploration of stimulation of jingqi and control of stimulation transformation,” Journal of Jilin University, no. 3, pp. 100–104, 1978. View at Google Scholar
  22. Z. H. Sun and L. S. Gao, My Opinion of Acupuncture, People's Medical Publishing House, Beijing, China, 1985.
  23. J. Wei, “The problem of deqi,” Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, no. 7, pp. 20–24, 1959. View at Google Scholar
  24. J. S. Peng and J. Z. Fei, The Secret and Unique Skill of Acupuncture, Liaoning Science and Technology Publishing House, Shenyang, China, 2008.
  25. X. T. Wang, Xuetai'S Opinion of Acupuncture, People's Medical Publishing House, Beijing, China, 2008.
  26. C. H. Feng, “My opinion of the needle sensation,” Journal of Zhejiang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 36–37, 1998. View at Google Scholar
  27. H. P. Zhen, “Preliminary study on Professor Chen Quan-xin's needling manipulation,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 28, no. 8, pp. 597–599, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. Y. P. Lin, X. Wang, and P. L. Zhang, “The exploration of the professor P.L.Zhang's academic thoughts,” Yunnan Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Medica, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 3–4, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  29. W. Yi, “The acupuncture characteristic of professor R.Jin,” Traditional Chinese Medicine Journal, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 39–40, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  30. X. S. Lai and Z. Tong, “The classification of deqi and the thought of capture,” Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, vol. 49, no. 5, pp. 392–394, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  31. D. Z. Tian, “Recessive deqi or recessive needle sensation,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, no. 10, pp. 602–603, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  32. Y. Z. Wang, “Enlightenment and thinking on deqi (arrival of needling sensation) by abdominal acupuncture,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 183–185, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. J. Han, Mechanisms of Acupuncture Analgesia, Shanghai Publisher of Scientific and Technological Education, Shanghai, China, 1999.
  34. L. Y. LIU, X. H. Yu, J. X. Zhang et al., “The development of acupuncture mechanical measurement instrument and the primary analysis of acupuncture manipulation,” Journal of Jiamusi Medical College, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 326–329, 1990. View at Google Scholar
  35. F. Luo, J. Q. Jiang, and H. Ye, “Analyze acupuncture of professor Tian Conghuo,” Liaoning Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 16–18, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  36. J. S. Yang, J.S.Yang's Clinical Treatment, Heilongjiang Science and Technology Press, Haerbin, China, 2000.
  37. S. Z. Yu, The Collection of S.Z.Yu's Experience of Acupuncture, Beijing Publishing House, Beijing, China, 1992.
  38. L. H. Zhao, Y. Huang, and Y. Pang, “The primary analysis of insert needle manipulation of professor L.Zhu,” Jiangsu Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 45–46, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  39. J. H. Gao, Y. M. Wang, J. J. Cui et al., “On the scientific foundation that the tissue structure of acupoints can decide and affect specificity of acupoints-organs effects,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 293–295, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. The Collaboration of Acupoints and Needle Sensation of Anhui University of Traditonal Chinese Medicine, “The morphologicl observation of acupoints needle sensation,” Acupuncture Research, no. 2, pp. 59–64, 1979. View at Google Scholar
  41. K. M. Wang, S. M. Yao, Y. L. Xian, and Z. L. Hou, “A study on the receptive field of acupoints and the relationship between characteristics of needling sensation and groups of afferent fibres,” Scientia Sinica B, vol. 28, no. 9, pp. 963–971, 1985. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. W. Z. Lin and P. Wang, Laboratory Acupuncture and Moxibustion (Chinese Edition), Shanghai Science and Technology Publishing House, Shanghai, China, 1999.
  43. G. W. Lu, “Characteristics of afferent fiber innervation on acupuncture points zusanli,” The American Journal of Physiology, vol. 245, no. 4, pp. R606–612, 1983. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. X. L. Wang, J. L. Fang, K. H. Zhou et al., “Impacts of the different tissue specificities of the acupoints on electroacupuncture sensations,” World Journal of Acupuncture-Moxibustion, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 48–54, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  45. X. F. Lou, S. H. Jiang, X. D. Xu et al., “The anatomic study of acupoints high densities,” Journal of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibusion, vol. 19, no. 6, p. 5, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  46. S. C. Zhang, “The manipulation of reinforcing and reducing methods in acupuncture,” Medical Journal of Shandong, no. 4, pp. 162–164, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  47. S. D. Wu, The Essence of Medical Cases of S.Y.Lu With Acupuncture, People's Medical Publishing House, Beijing, China, 1984.
  48. S. Y. Li, “The effect of conventional medicine to the change of modern theory of acupuncture and moxibustion,” Liaoning Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, vol. 37, no. 6, pp. 1019–1021, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  49. L. Zhu, New Acupuncture, Guangxi People's Publishing House, Nanning, China, 1980.
  50. Q. Dong, “The abstract of the academic thoughts of professor Z.M.Yang,” Journal of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibusion, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 5–7, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  51. P. Xiang and Y. B. Xia, The Collection of D.A.Cheng's Experience of Acupuncture, Shanghai Science and Technology Press, Shanghai, China, 2004.
  52. P. R. He, Acupuncture Instrument and Acupuncture Therapy, Scientific and Technical Documentation Press, Beijing, China, 1989.
  53. K. Cheng, J. S. Yang, Y. Y. Wang et al., “The opinion of academician X.N.Cheng of deqi: retaining needle and deqi,” China News of Traditional Chinese Medicine, no. 4, p. 1, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  54. Y. Liu, X. R. An, X. D. Wang et al., “The academic thoughts and clinical experience of professor Q.S.Ji,” Journal of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibustion, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 6–7, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  55. Y. W. Zhu, “Academic strong points and clinical experience of veteran TCM doctor Luo Shirong,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 162–164, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  56. X. Z. Guo, “The experience of improving the acupuncture effect,” Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, no. 11, pp. 51–52, 1984. View at Google Scholar
  57. Z. C. Wu, “Essence of Professor Qiu Maoliang's acupuncture manipulation methods and deqi,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 21, no. 5, p. 298, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  58. R. Yi, “Analysis and discussion on professor Guan Zun-hui's academic characteristics of acupuncture and moxibustion,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 657–659, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. K. Cheng, J. S. Yang, Y. Y. Wang et al., “The opinion of academician X.N.Cheng of deqi: prognosis and deqi,” China News of Traditional Chinese Medicine, no. 4, p. 1, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  60. L. Guan and C. Liu, “Progresses of study on correlativity of qi-arrival of needling with clinical therapeutic effect and its action mechanism,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 29, no. 11, pp. 945–948, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus