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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 541695, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/541695
Research Article

Curcumin Suppresses Metastasis via Sp-1, FAK Inhibition, and E-Cadherin Upregulation in Colorectal Cancer

1Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
2Center of Genomic Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
3Graduate Institute of Toxicology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
4Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 100, Taiwan
5Graduate Institute of Pathology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
6Center for Optoelectronic Biomedicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan

Received 12 April 2013; Accepted 17 June 2013

Academic Editor: Hyung-In Moon

Copyright © 2013 Chun-Chieh Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a serious public health problem that results due to changes of diet and various environmental stress factors in the world. Curcumin is a traditional medicine used for treatment of a wide variety of tumors. However, antimetastasis mechanism of curcumin on CRC has not yet been completely investigated. Here, we explored the underlying molecular mechanisms of curcumin on metastasis of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin significantly inhibits cell migration, invasion, and colony formation in vitro and reduces tumor growth and liver metastasis in vivo. We found that curcumin suppresses Sp-1 transcriptional activity and Sp-1 regulated genes including ADEM10, calmodulin, EPHB2, HDAC4, and SEPP1 in CRC cells. Curcumin inhibits focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and enhances the expressions of several extracellular matrix components which play a critical role in invasion and metastasis. Curcumin reduces CD24 expression in a dose-dependent manner in CRC cells. Moreover, E-cadherin expression is upregulated by curcumin and serves as an inhibitor of EMT. These results suggest that curcumin executes its antimetastasis function through downregulation of Sp-1, FAK, and CD24 and by promoting E-cadherin expression in CRC cells.