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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 563716, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/563716
Review Article

On the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers and Their Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in the Central Nervous System: Focus on Their Role in Pain Modulation

1Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 8, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden
2Faculty of Science, University of Malaga, 29080 Malaga, Spain
3Laboratory of Eukaryotic Gene Expression and Signal Transduction (LEGEST), Ghent University-Gent, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
4Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Institute for Informatics and Automation, 193167 Saint Petersburg, Russia
5IRCCS, Lido Venice, 41100 Venice, Italy

Received 27 February 2013; Revised 20 May 2013; Accepted 24 May 2013

Academic Editor: Yi-Hung Chen

Copyright © 2013 Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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