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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 614501, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/614501
Research Article

Antimicrobial Activity of Lippia Species from the Brazilian Semiarid Region Traditionally Used as Antiseptic and Anti-Infective Agents

1Laboratório de Química de Produtos Naturais e Bioativos, Departamento de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Avenida Transnordestina S/N, Bairro Novo Horizonte, Campus Universitário, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, BA, Brazil
2Laboratório de Microbiologia da Agroindústria, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Campus Soane Nazaré de Andrade, Km 16 Rodovia Ilhéus-Itabuna, 45662-900 Ilhéus, BA, Brazil
3Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Avenida Transnordestina S/N, Bairro Novo Horizonte, Campus Universitário, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, BA, Brazil

Received 15 July 2013; Accepted 7 August 2013

Academic Editor: Vincenzo De Feo

Copyright © 2013 Cristiana da Purificação Pinto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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