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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 628907, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/628907
Review Article

Placebo Acupuncture Devices: Considerations for Acupuncture Research

1Department of Neurology, Dongzhimen Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, No. 5 Haiyuncang, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100700, China
2Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129, USA

Received 8 March 2013; Accepted 24 May 2013

Academic Editor: Lijun Bai

Copyright © 2013 Dan Zhu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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