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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 639302, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/639302
Review Article

The Historical Development of Deqi Concept from Classics of Traditional Chinese Medicine to Modern Research: Exploitation of the Connotation of Deqi in Chinese Medicine

1School of Acupuncture Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
2School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069, China
3The Key Unit of Evaluation of Characteristic Acupuncture Therapy, State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
4Beijing Electric Power Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100073, China

Received 12 May 2013; Revised 11 September 2013; Accepted 18 September 2013

Academic Editor: Lijun Bai

Copyright © 2013 Hong-Wen Yuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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