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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 658030, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/658030
Research Article

Comparing Once- versus Twice-Weekly Yoga Classes for Chronic Low Back Pain in Predominantly Low Income Minorities: A Randomized Dosing Trial

1Department of Family Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, 1 Boston Medical Center Place, Dowling 5 South, Boston, MA 02118, USA
2Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA
3Group Health Research Institute, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA 98112, USA
4Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA

Received 25 February 2013; Accepted 9 May 2013

Academic Editor: David Baxter

Copyright © 2013 Robert B. Saper et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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