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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 674183, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/674183
Research Article

The Influence of New Colored Light Stimulation Methods on Heart Rate Variability, Temperature, and Well-Being: Results of a Pilot Study in Humans

Stronach Research Unit for Complementary and Integrative Laser Medicine, Research Unit of Biomedical Engineering in Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, and TCM Research Center Graz, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 29, 8036 Graz, Austria

Received 14 October 2013; Accepted 6 November 2013

Academic Editor: Wei He

Copyright © 2013 Daniela Litscher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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