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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 697632, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/697632
Research Article

Rhodiola rosea Impairs Acquisition and Expression of Conditioned Place Preference Induced by Cocaine

1Pharmacognosy Unit, School of Pharmacy, University of Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri 9, 62032 Camerino , Italy
2Unit of Research on Psychobiology of Drug Dependence, Department of Psychobiology, School of Psychology, University of Valencia, Avenida Blasco Ibañez 21, 46010 Valencia, Spain

Received 26 June 2013; Revised 17 August 2013; Accepted 26 August 2013

Academic Editor: Yi-Wen Lin

Copyright © 2013 Federica Titomanlio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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