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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 812096, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/812096
Research Article

A Randomized Controlled Neurophysiological Study of a Chinese Chan-Based Mind-Body Intervention in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

1Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
2Chanwuyi Research Center for Neuropsychological Well-Being, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
3Henan Songshan Research Institute for Chanwuyi, Henan 452470, China
4Department of Special Education and Counselling, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Tai Po, Hong Kong
5Division II, Kwai Chung Hospital, Kwai Chung, Hong Kong
6Department of Social Work, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong

Received 28 June 2013; Revised 27 November 2013; Accepted 12 December 2013

Academic Editor: Kevin Chen

Copyright © 2013 Agnes S. Chan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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