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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 812568, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/812568
Review Article

Neurobiological Foundations of Acupuncture: The Relevance and Future Prospect Based on Neuroimaging Evidence

1The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering, Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
2Center for Integrative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, 520 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 21 March 2013; Accepted 17 April 2013

Academic Editor: Baixiao Zhao

Copyright © 2013 Lijun Bai and Lixing Lao. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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