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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 836234, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/836234
Research Article

Social and Cultural Factors Affecting Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use during Menopause in Sydney and Bologna

1The National Institute for Complementary Medicine, University of Western Sydney Campbelltown Campus, Goldsmith Ave, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
2National Center for Epidemiology, Health Surveillance and Promotion (CNESPS), National Institute of Health, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy
3Primary Care Department, Bologna Local Health Unit, Via S. Isaia 94/2, 40100 Bologna, Italy
4Healthcare and Social Agency of Emilia Romagna Region, Viale Aldo Moro 21, 40127 Bologna, Italy

Received 29 August 2013; Revised 19 November 2013; Accepted 3 December 2013

Academic Editor: Jenny M. Wilkinson

Copyright © 2013 Corinne van der Sluijs et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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