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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 913671, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/913671
Research Article

Evaluations of the Antimicrobial Activities and Chemical Compositions of Body Fat from the Amphibians Leptodactylus macrosternum Miranda-Ribeiro (1926) and Leptodactylus vastus Adolf Lutz (1930) in Northeastern Brazil

1Laboratory of Zoology, Regional University of Cariri-URCA, Pimenta, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil
2Laboratory of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Regional University of Cariri-URCA, Pimenta, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil
3Laboratory of Natural Products Research, Regional University of Cariri-URCA, Pimenta, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil
4Laboratory of Phamacology and Medicinal Chemistry, Regional University of Cariri-URCA, Pimenta, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil
5Department of Biology, Paraiba State University-UEPB, 58429-500 João Pessoa, PB, Brazil

Received 17 January 2013; Revised 18 March 2013; Accepted 4 April 2013

Academic Editor: Edwin L. Cooper

Copyright © 2013 Mario Eduardo Santos Cabral et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Leptodactylus macrosternum and L. vastus (family: Leptodactylidae) are commonly encountered in the “Caatinga” biome in northern Brazil. The body fat of L. vastus is used as a zootherapeutic for treating a number of human maladies. The aim of this work was to determine the chemical composition of the body fats of L. macrosternum and L. vastus and to evaluate their antimicrobial activities as well as the ecological implications of their use in traditional folk medicine. Oils were extracted from body fat located in the ventral region of L. macrosternum (OLM) and L. vastus (OLV) using hexane as a solvent. The fatty acids were identified by GC-MS. The antimicrobial activities of the oils, either alone or in combination with antibiotics and antifungal drugs, were tested on standard strains of microorganisms as well as on multiresistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus. OLM contained 40% saturated and 60% unsaturated fatty acids, while OLV contained 58.33% saturated and 41.67% unsaturated fatty acids. Our results indicated that both OLM and OLV demonstrated relevant antimicrobial activities (with MIC 256 μg/mL for both) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida krusei. However, no antimicrobial effects were observed when these oils were combined with antibiotics or antifungal drugs.