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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 952432, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/952432
Research Article

Ayurveda: Between Religion, Spirituality, and Medicine

1Department of Internal and Complementary Medicine, Immanuel Hospital and Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology & Health Economics, Charité-University Medical Center, Research Coordination, Königstraße 63, 14109 Berlin, Germany
2eScience Center, University of Bremen, Universitätsallee, 28359 Bremen, Germany
3Graduate School in History and Sociology, Bielefeld University, 33615 Bielefeld, Germany
4Institute of Complementary Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, 8001 Zurich, Switzerland
5Department for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Königin-Elisabeth-Herzberge Hospital, 10365 Berlin, Germany

Received 6 June 2013; Revised 5 September 2013; Accepted 3 October 2013

Academic Editor: Arndt Büssing

Copyright © 2013 C. Kessler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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