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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 982380, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/982380
Research Article

Zhen Gan Xi Feng Decoction, a Traditional Chinese Herbal Formula, for the Treatment of Essential Hypertension: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

1Department of Cardiology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beixiange 5, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China
2Department of Gastroenterology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China
3Graduate School, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
4Department of Endocrinology, Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Mentougou District, Beijing 102300, China
5The First Clinical Medical College, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu 210029, China
6Department of Cardiology, Beijing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100010, China
7Department of Cardiology, Worker’s Hospital of Kweichow Moutai Co., Ltd., Guizhou 564501, China
8Basic Medical College, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China

Received 21 August 2012; Accepted 22 February 2013

Academic Editor: Tabinda Ashfaq

Copyright © 2013 Xingjiang Xiong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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