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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 107571, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/107571
Research Article

Investigation of the Lower Resistance Meridian: Speculation on the Pathophysiological Functions of Acupuncture Meridians

1Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
2Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China

Received 27 May 2014; Accepted 17 July 2014; Published 2 December 2014

Academic Editor: Younbyoung Chae

Copyright © 2014 Weisheng Yang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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