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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 140724, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/140724
Review Article

Mindfulness-Based Therapies in the Treatment of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, 1255 Sheppard Ave East, Toronto, ON, Canada M2K 1E2

Received 4 July 2014; Accepted 19 August 2014; Published 11 September 2014

Academic Editor: Toku Takahashi

Copyright © 2014 Monique Aucoin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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