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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 169130, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/169130
Review Article

Honey: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Managing Diabetic Wounds

1Human Genome Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342, Bangladesh

Received 16 July 2014; Accepted 29 September 2014; Published 15 October 2014

Academic Editor: Pradeep Visen

Copyright © 2014 Fahmida Alam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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